Contagious Equine Metritis is a venereal disease of horses. It is caused by the Taylorella equigenitalis organism which can cause infertility in stallions and mares. It is a highly contagious organism which is transmitted by affected stallions or mares during mating.


No. We did have an outbreak in the 70's caused by an infected stallion imported from Europe to Kentucky. That outbreak resulted in damages reaching over $1,000,000 a day for the period of time that it shut down the Kentucky breeding industry. As a direct result of that outbreak and to protect our breeding industry, our government placed the restrictions on imported animals that we see today.


Mares are generally here for 15- 17 days and stallions are here for about 32 days.


Mares are characterized by a purulent vaginal discharge, endometritis, and short-term infertility. Subsequent to infection, mares can become carriers of the organism even though they act normally and appear unaffected.

Stallions, once infected, do not develop clinical signs of the disease. Carrier stallions look normal but they harbor the organism on the surface of their external genitalia as well as internally in their reproductive organs.



If any cultures or tests are positive for the CEM bacteria, the stallion must be treated again for 5 consecutive days and then re-tested by being bred to two test mares no less that 21 days after the last treatment.

It should be noted that the USDA has treatment protocols in place for the treatment of horses infected with CEM, however the accredited veterinarian may modify treatment procedures and make them more stringent than the mandatory protocols set forth in the USDA regulations.


If any cultures test positive for the CEM bacteria, the mare must be recultured again on three separate occasions within a 7 day period, starting no less than 21 days after the last day of treatment. The mare must also have the treatment repeated for another 5 consecutive days.

It should be noted that the USDA has treatment protocols in place for the treatment of horses infected with CEM, however the accredited veterinarian may modify treatment procedures and make them more stringent than the mandatory protocols set forth in the USDA regulations.



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Yes. For specific discounts, please see here for our pricing page.


We have excellent turnout available. We do advise owners to thoroughly discuss the advisability of turn out for their particular horse. Depending on temperament and level of current training, it is often advisable to opt for the safer alternative of exercising on our exercise machine.


Yes, visits are permitted. We ask that prior arrangements be made and an appointment set up in advance of the visit.


Geldings do not have to do CEM quarantine. All other animals over 732 days of age - fillies and mares, colts and stallions - have to do Quarantine.





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